Smarter Sorting Classification Portal

Classification portal is a patented technology to help retailers and suppliers handle regulated items.

Year

2020

Timeline

4 months

Team

Tom Williamson(Senior UX Designer)
Jake LaCivitas (Product Manager)

Role

I led an end to end design process for a web dashboard and added components to the already existing design system

Project overview

Patented technology to help retailers and suppliers handle regulated items

Product

Smarter Sorting’s classification portal streamlines receiving and managing regulatory information for all products in one place

Challenge

This process of sending and receiving this data is disjointed creating friction between Retailers and Suppliers

Solution

A dashboard that captures all data of the inventory and can help with providing real time insights through custom reporting.

01.

Research

A. Understanding the Product space

Before I deep dive into the project,  let us first understand the context. We all know Costco, they are big retailers and they sell stuff to people, in order to sell stuff, Costco needs to classify all their products. In order to classify them they require regulatory information from supplier. 

Currently, this process is disjointed and tedious and some still use Google sheets for handling and maintaining these sheets. It takes months to get items on shelves, items are often misclassified and this costs time and money. 

Smarter Sorting's classification portal is trying to solve this market gap by providing a more robust digital framework and enabling better communication between retailers and their suppliers.

B. Semi-structured Interviews

After the preliminary research, we focused on interviewing Internal Stakeholders to understand what the business needs and align my project with what they envision the future of the product to be. We also conducted User Interviews with Retailers and Suppliers to understand the pain points and requirements from both user groups.

02.

Analysis

A. Externalization

Here I identified different work roles amongst the user group. I defined their
1. Needs.
2. Extracted Solutions for this.
3. Proposed possible features.

B. Prioritizing user needs

After scoping down my user group and extracting all the possible needs and solutions for them, I focused on prioritizing them for all the User groups. I built a Priority Matrix by calculating its Opportunity score by understanding its importance and user satisfaction that was obtained through user interviews. This helped me build an MVP that could be rolled out in the near future, while actively thinking about an ideal final product.

I went ahead and used this Priority matrix to identify the most important user needs for all the user groups. With this I have a documented list of needs that i can tap back on when designing any feature or flow.

03.

Ideation

A. Grouping user needs

With a list of needs that users have I went ahead and grouped them into categories. These categories were loosely based on their function.

Wireframing
After collecting information, I needed to focus on what is important and how might we arrange this information on a single screen so that it follows a certain hierarchy that is meaningful and quick to read. For this purpose I used these 3 principles to guide me for visual designing.
Final Prototype
From the requirement extraction with the help of my guiding principles, I went ahead and started iterating on my designs. This exercise proved to be a tool to help with business decisions.

    04.

    Final Prototype

    Classifier Facing Dashboard

    The externalization helped me in listing down all the feature that could be used by our users. But I needed to sit through and think which set of features generate the most value especially for our MVP-1. All these features are then categorized and grouped together based on their function.

    Supplier Facing Dashboard
    After collecting information, I needed to focus on what is important and how might we arrange this information on a single screen so that it follows a certain hierarchy that is meaningful and quick to read. For this purpose I used these 3 principles to guide me for visual designing.
    Visual exploration
    Notifications

    When I was ideating, I made sure the look of the notifications followed a similar design language as Smarter Sorting's already existing design language. 
    The main function of the alert center is to provide notifications. But what are considered notifications and what is just noise? These were some of the questions I had to answer before getting into the details of actually designing the notification cards. Based on the research and constant feedback from the industryexperts at Smarter Sorting, I decided all the use cases where a notification might appear; there were 6.

    More Case Studies